Stage

What Goes Around

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Tuesday, October 08, 2013

At the end of Lorraine Hansberry’s precedent-shattering play A Raisin in the Sun, the Younger family are preparing to move out of their cramped apartment in an all-black Chicago neighborhood into a house “with a garden” in an all-white suburb. This despite their misgivings, underlined by pleas and threats from their prospective neighbors. That’s where Clybourne Park, Bruce Norris’s 2010 Tony- and Pulitzer-winning play, begins—in the house a white couple is about to sell to the Youngers, despite their neighbors’ pleas, threats and dire predictions. The play then flashes forward 50 years, to the same house in what has become, thanks to the thin-edged wedge represented by the Youngers, an all-black neighborhood, now threatened by encroaching gentrification from white families.

Through Oct. 13, Barrington Stage Company, 30 Union St., Pittsfield, (413) 236-8888, barringtonstageco.org.

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